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'Greener' company establishes a home in Kent | Business roundup

Ingenium, a full-spectrum innovative environmental services company, has opened a new facility in Kent, with the capability to serve the Pacific Northwest.

The company provides creative, sustainable solutions for regulated waste management.

Corey Johnson, an environmental science professional with more 12 years in the industry, heads operations.

"It's a smaller company but it's their initial presence in the Northwest," said Josh Hall, economic development specialist for the city of Kent. "They are looking to grow and expand."

Ingenium's Kent operation, at 8206 S. 192 St., is expected to bring new jobs to the area and help businesses that produce hazardous, biomedical and radiological waste find solutions that go beyond disposal.

Company officials hope to have a workforce of 30-40 employees within two years.

"We are proud to be in the vanguard of regulated waste management in California and other Western States Ingenium currently serves," Gary Lundstedt, executive director of Ingenium, said in a news release. "With Washington and other Pacific Northwest states commitment to going 'green,' it's a natural move for us to expand in this area.

"Our planned expansion was even further expedited when we were able to bring Corey on board," Lundstedt said, "and we look forward to serving the region's businesses with all the latest in sustainable procedures and processes."

Ingenium, based out of Escondido, Calif., is the latest "green" company to discover and help diversify Kent. Lundstedt better classifies his company as a "greener" one committed to the sector of environmental services that support business.

"We try to offer more green and sustainable solutions for people in the area of waste management and hazardous waste management," Lundstedt said. "We try to actually get the businesses to not do business with us. We want them to not generate hazardous waste. We work with them on process changes and implementations to eliminate the volume of the waste that they do. And then, during that process, we also try to put processes in place where the waste that they do generate has a residual value, either as fuels or a recoverable value."

Kent is Ingenium's third market, joining the San Diego and San Jose areas.

In preparation for the move, Ingenium became a member of the WBBA (Washington Biotechnology and Biomedical Association), www.washbio.org. The company's goal is to assist WBBA life science members with information and support for the latest techniques in minimizing waste production, carbon footprint and reducing costs.

"We are very pleased to have as a member a service provider with Ingenium's unique approach to our special waste issues," said Dennis Kroft, director of marketing and Membership of the WBBA. "We have already met to discuss ways to develop panel discussions to assist our member companies, and the Seattle area as a whole, in understanding that materials once managed as hazardous waste or medical waste can now be recycled or re-purposed in other ways."

Ingenium was recently recognized by Inc 5000 as one of the fastest growing environmental services companies in the United States.

More information about the company, visit www.pureingenium.com.

Elsewhere

• Murray's Collision, of Kent, has been awarded the prestigious 2011 Angie's List Super Service Award, an honor given annually based on consumer reviews.

"Only a fraction of the businesses rated on Angie's List can claim the sterling customer service record of being a Super Service Award winner because we set a high bar," said Angie's List Founder Angie Hicks. "The fact that Murray's Collision can claim Super Service Award status speaks volumes about its dedication to consumers."

Award winners have met strict eligibility requirements, including earning a minimum number of reports, an exemplary rating from their customers and abiding by Angie's List operational guidelines.

Service business ratings are updated daily on Angie's List, but members can find the 2011 Super Service Award logo next to business names in search results on www.angieslist.com.

• This Earth Month, Staples stores of Kent, on 104th Avenue and East Valley Highway, are collecting three-ring binders in partnership with TerraCycle, a recycler and upcycler of traditionally non-recyclable goods. Customers can bring any binder into the stores for recycling and receive $2 off the purchase of a new binder.

The program is the first of its kind, and is exclusive to Staples.

Other Staples locations around Seattle also are collecting binders.

TerraCycle also runs free, local fundraising programs in Kent and across Washington. Schools and community organizations can sign up to recycle non-recyclables with TerraCycle (including drink pouches, chip bags, pens, tape dispensers, wine pouches, and candy wrappers). For every item they send in, they earn money toward their school or a charity of their choice.

In Kent, Scenic Hill, Panther Lake and Springbrook elementaries collect non-recyclables to earn money for their school.

• The Coldwell Banker Bain Kent Station office has earned the 2011 Coldwell Banker Top Company Recruiting and Retention Award for the U.S. The national award recognizes the company in the Coldwell Banker U.S. network demonstrating the highest net growth in company size last year.

"Debra Snoey, principal managing broker, has exceeded expectations for growth in the last year and set a standard of excellence for all others to aspire to," said Jim Gillespie, CEO of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.

Added Snoey: "This award belongs to every broker in the office as each contributes to the energy, integrity and success this office has achieved."

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