Arts and Entertainment

Legendary McGuire, York to perform March 22

Barry McGuire, left, and John York will perform the sounds of the ’60s at 7 p.m. Friday, March 22 at the Kentlake High School Performing Arts Center.  - Courtesy photo
Barry McGuire, left, and John York will perform the sounds of the ’60s at 7 p.m. Friday, March 22 at the Kentlake High School Performing Arts Center.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

Music legends Barry McGuire and John York perform "Trippin' The '60s" on Friday, March 22 at the Kentlake High School Performing Arts Center, 21401 SE 300th St., Kent.

Doors open at 6 p.m. Show time is 7.

McGuire and York perform a great collection of songs and stories from the groups made famous during the 1960s and 1970s.

McGuire, a singer-songwriter, is best known for the hit song "Eve of Destruction", and later as a pioneering singer and songwriter of Contemporary Christian music.

Currently working with McGuire in "Trippin' The Sixties," York is best known for his work as a member of the world-renowned folk rock/country rock group, the Byrds.

McGuire's mark

For nearly five decades, McGuire has shared his unique style of folk and gospel music blended with insightful and heartwarming stories. McGuire, like many musicians, got his start singing solo in bars and clubs around the Los Angeles area.

In 1962, he joined The New Christy Minstrels where fame came calling. Their first album remained on the charts for 92 weeks. In 1963, McGuire wrote the greatest and first hit single for The New Christy Minstrels: "Green, Green". He wrote it as the result of losing his girl friend to another guy.

McGuire co-wrote "Greenback Dollar" made a hit by the Kingston Trio, but he never received credit for it. In 1965, he wrote the "Eve of Destruction" on a piece of paper, crumpled it up and put it in his pocket for a week. During the recording, McGuire sings "Ahh, you can't twist the truth". The "Ahh was because he couldn't read the words from the crumpled paper. The following Monday it was already a hit.

York's influence

York was a bass player for The Byrds from 1968 to 1969. Their hits included "Turn, Turn, Turn" and "Mr. Tambourine Man". York and McGuire had many contacts with bands and musicians such as the Mamas and Papas and Roger McGuinn, as well as a gospel music background. They delight audiences by sharing these experiences and stories.

Opening for McGuire and York will be The Icicle River Band.

The show will also be performed at Renton Civic Theater at 2 p.m. March 24.

Tickets are $10-$25. Order online at www.brownpapertickets.com.

For more information, visit greatwesternconcerts.org.

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