Joey Simanek was awarded second place for his powerful work that uses hand-cut copper images to symbolize different aspects of activism.

Kent students’ works recognized at Holocaust Center for Humanity’s Writing, Art, & Film Contest

  • Thursday, July 6, 2017 11:59am
  • Life

Kent Mountain View Academy juniors Joey Simanek and Naomi Knipp and sophomore Timothy Jenkins received honors at the Holocaust Center for Humanity’s 2017 Writing, Art and Film Contest.

Simanek was awarded second place in the high school art category for his powerful work that uses hand-cut copper images to symbolize different aspects of activism.

Knipp received an honorable mention in the same category for his work depicting a woman shouting past the red hand of misogyny in order to fight the injustices women face.

Jenkins got honorable mention in the high school writing category for his piece, “Who was I?”

In addition, eighth-grader Samantha Alfonso of Meridian Middle School received an honorable mention in the middle school essay category of the contest. Samantha’s piece, “I’m Sorry,” is a stirring call to protest injustice.

The students’ artwork was honored in a community reception July 16 at the Henry and Sandra Friedman Holocaust Center for Humanity in Seattle. Their work will be displayed at the Holocaust Center, at events, and in publications throughout the year.

This year 913 students entered the Center’s Writing, Art and Film Contest, including 184 entries in the high school art category alone.

“When the entries pour in from students around the state, from rural and urban public schools, parochial schools, students who are home schooled — really all over – we see that students strive and genuinely intend to improve our world. It’s very inspiring, and tells us that our work at the Center is as important today as it’s ever been,” said Ilana Cone Kennedy, director of education at the center.

Naomi Knipp received an honorable mention for his work depicting a woman shouting past the red hand of misogyny in order to fight the injustices women face.

More in Life

Hot day parade

Kent Cornucopia Days parade photos

You’ll be up on your feet after reading ‘And Then We Danced’

You can’t stop your feet. They need to move, to tap-tap-tap, to… Continue reading

Being bold, being heard

UTOPIA Seattle working to enhance the lives of queer and trans people in the area

We still have work to do to destigmatize suicide | GUEST OP

Like any other medical condition, mental illness is treatable and often curable

My Favorite Martins

Steve Martin and Martin Short discuss bringing their two-man comedy extravaganza back to Seattle.

Most Read