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Flood Control District funds 14 critical projects, including levee improvements for Auburn, Kent, Renton

The King County Flood Control District has budgeted $12 million to construct a setback Reddington levee in Auburn that protects nearly 600 developed parcels with an assessed value of more than $680 million.  - Courtesy photo/Ned Ahrens, King County
The King County Flood Control District has budgeted $12 million to construct a setback Reddington levee in Auburn that protects nearly 600 developed parcels with an assessed value of more than $680 million.
— image credit: Courtesy photo/Ned Ahrens, King County

Preparing for a predicted wet flood season, the King County Flood Control District Board of Supervisors this week adopted a 2013 budget totaling $41 million.

They also adopted a six-year capital improvement program (CIP) that will guide the Flood Control District's flood risk reduction activities into the future.

The budget funds 14 major levee rehabilitation projects across King County, provides over $3.7 million to 40 jurisdictions for local flooding and stormwater projects through the Flood Control District's Opportunity Fund and improves flood awareness, response programs and facility maintenance.

Specific project examples across King County to be implemented over 2013-18 include:

• Reddington levee (Auburn): $12 million to construct a setback levee that protects nearly 600 developed parcels with an assessed value of more than $680 million.

• Levee improvements (Kent and Renton): $30 million to make improvements to levees protecting dense commercial, industrial, and manufacturing areas in Kent and Renton.

• Elliott Bay Seawall (Seattle): $28 million to help rebuild the failing seawall that protects Downtown Seattle.

• Coal Creek Channel Improvements (Bellevue): $8.5 million to reduce flood risks along Coal Creek.

• South Fork Snoqualmie Levee (Upper Snoqualmie): $8.7 million to reconstruct sections of the levees that protect residential and commercial areas of North Bend.

• Home Elevations (Upper and Lower Snoqualmie): $6.2 million to acquire or elevate at-risk homes in and around the cities of Snoqualmie and North Bend and $2.3 million to reduce risks to home and agricultural operations in the Lower Snoqualmie.

• Sinnema Quale Revetment (Lower Snoqualmie): Over $3.3 million to reconstruct a failing revetment that protects SR 203 and the Snoqualmie Valley Trail near Carnation.

"Since its creation in 2008, the Flood Control District has been working to reduce flood risks, successfully completing 63 projects throughout King County," stated Board Chair Julia Patterson. "Adoption of this budget ensures additional critical levee projects will be implemented, protecting people, property, and the regional economy. These efforts would have taken over 20 years to complete without Flood Control District funding."

Kathy Lambert, an executive committee member, recognized district actions that have benefited her council district, the most frequently flooded area in the county.

"The District has completed 30 flood damage repairs, 40 buyouts of at-risk homes, 50 home and barn elevations, and provided support for 26 farm pads. These activities move residents and businesses out of harm's way, and allow farmers to safely move livestock and equipment to higher ground during flood events."

In addition to flood prevention projects and activities, the budget provides $3.15 million in funding to improve water quality, protect and restore habitat and support salmon recovery efforts in four King County watersheds.

To learn more, visit www.kingcountyfloodcontrol.org.

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