Amazon to hire 50,000 for warehouse jobs across U.S., including Kent

Seattle-based Amazon announced on Wednesday it has more than 50,000 jobs available to fill across its U.S. fulfillment center network, including hundreds of jobs in Kent.

For anyone who has ever been curious about what working at Amazon is like and how the retailer fulfills customer orders at super-fast speed, the company is opening up 10 of its fulfillment centers from 8 a.m. to noon local time on Wednesday, Aug. 2, for its first Jobs Day with tours and information sessions, according to an Amazon media release. The Kent center is at 21005 64th Ave. S.

Candidates can come on-site to learn more about working at Amazon and the technology it utilizes in its operations. The company plans to make thousands of on-the-spot job offers to qualified candidates who apply on-site as part of Amazon Jobs Day.

“We’re excited to be creating great jobs that offer highly-competitive wages, benefits starting on day one and the chance for employees to go back to school through our Career Choice program,” said John Olsen, vice president of Amazon’s Worldwide Operations Human Resources. “On August 2, we are excited to host interested candidates to come learn more about the technology we utilize in our operations, see our dedicated onsite classrooms, meet employees and, if interested, apply for a job at our site and receive an on-the-spot job offer. These are great opportunities with runway for advancement. In fact, of our entry level managers across Amazon’s U.S. fulfillment centers, nearly 15 percent started in hourly roles and were promoted into their current positions.”

Amazon is hiring for tens of thousands of full-time opportunities at its fulfillment centers for employees who will pick, pack and ship customer orders. The company says these opportunities offer highly-competitive pay, health insurance, disability insurance, retirement savings plans and company stock. The company also offers up to 20 weeks of paid leave and innovative benefits such as Leave Share and Ramp Back, which give new parents flexibility with their growing families. Leave Share lets employees share their Amazon paid leave with their spouse or domestic partner if their spouse’s employer doesn’t offer paid leave. Ramp Back gives new moms additional control over the pace at which they return to work.

More than 10,000 of these opportunities will be part-time jobs at the company’s sortation centers. These positions will sort and consolidate customer packages to enable super-fast shipping speeds and Sunday delivery for customers. Employees who work more than 20 hours per week receive benefits, including life and disability insurance, dental and vision insurance with premiums paid in full by Amazon, and funding towards medical insurance.

Full-time and part-time hourly employees are both eligible for Amazon’s innovative Career Choice program that pre-pays 95 percent of tuition for courses related to in-demand fields, regardless of whether the skills are relevant to a future career at Amazon. The company has built dedicated Career Choice classrooms at more than 25 fulfillment centers to make it easier for employees to go back to school by offering classes onsite.

Amazon Jobs Day events will be held at the company’s fulfillment centers in the following locations:

Baltimore, Maryland

Chattanooga, Tennessee

Etna, Ohio

Fall River, Massachusetts

Hebron, Kentucky

Kenosha, Wisconsin

Kent, Washington

Robbinsville, New Jersey

Romeoville, Illinois

Whitestown, Indiana

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