Community called on to help with presidential search at Highline College

  • Thursday, November 2, 2017 10:29am
  • News

As many as eight members of the South King County community will be asked to serve on a subcommittee to help in the search to replace Jack Bermingham, who retired earlier this year as Highline College president.

During a special public meeting Monday on campus, the college’s board of trustees approved the overall makeup of the group.

In addition to community members, the subcommittee will include college staff and faculty and at least one student. Up to 18 people are expected to serve on the subcommittee. Once the names of the subcommittee members have been made final, the list will be voted on by the five-member board during a public meeting.

Board members also voted to move forward in contract negotiations with Gold Hill Associates, a national search firm specializing in community college executive searches. Gold Hill was one of five firms to respond to the board’s request for quote, issued at the end of September. The board is expected to take final action on a contract with the firm at a future meeting.

The next special board meeting is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 7, in the Mt. Skokomish Room of Building 8 (Highline Student Union) on the college’s main campus, 2400 S 240th St., Des Moines. Once the meeting’s topics have been set, a notice will be available on the board’s meeting agendas page.

The timeline for the presidential search process has not been determined. Board members have said their goal is to have a new leader in place no later than July 1, 2018.

Jeff Wagnitz is serving as interim president. After a permanent replacement for Bermingham is found, Wagnitz will return full time to his previous role as a vice president.

Highline’s board is responsible for selecting and employing the college president. It is composed of community members from Highline’s service area of South King County: Dan Altmayer and Bob Roegner, both of Federal Way; Debrena Jackson Gandy, Des Moines; Fred Mendoza, Normandy Park; and Sili Savusa, White Center.

More in News

King County Elections mails Primary ballots

Prepaid postage makes voting by Aug. 7 even easier

Man charged with fatally shooting estranged wife

Tracked her to SUV in Kent shopping plaza

East James Street to close for construction July 21-Aug. 9

City urges drivers to use South 277th, 212th streets

Services set for longtime Kentridge High athletic director Anderson

Memorial July 22 at KR gym; mass July 23 in Renton

Puget Sound Fire call report

Number, type of incidents

The Carlton Complex wildfire burned in north-central Washington state in 2014. Photo by Jason Kriess/Wikimedia Commons
King County burn ban under way

Other counties across the state have already enacted similar restrictions.

Between Seattle’s $15 minimum wage and the new no-poach cause agreement, Washington has been leading the nation in advancing fast food workers’ rights. Photo by Fibonacci Blue/Flickr
Washington AG’s deal grants mobility to fast food workers nationwide

Seven fast food chains have agreed to end no-poaching policies that economists say cause wage stagnation.

Dianne Laurine, a Commissioner for the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities says that she needs plastic straws to drink liquids, and that she easily bites through ones made out of paper. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
Straw ban leaves disabled community feeling high and dry

Although disabled people are exempted from Seattle’s new law, the impacted community says that businesses haven’t gotten the message.

Most Read