Museum to honor veterans with music and ceremony

  • Friday, November 10, 2017 9:32am
  • News

The Museum of Flight honors America’s Veterans with music, ceremonies and a new exhibit featuring the Congressional Medal of Honor on Veterans Day.

The event begins at 11 a.m. Saturday with an hour of patriotic music performed by the Boeing Employee’s Concert Band, followed at noon with a ceremony featuring Tukwila Mayor Allan Ekberg and Tukwila City Council member Joe Duffie, who served with the National Guard for 31 years.

The events culminate with a special commemoration of a new exhibit of the Congressional Gold Medal.

Museum President and CEO Matt Hayes will officially unveil the Congressional Gold Medal. In 2015 this particular medal was awarded to the American Fighter Aces Association for the heroism of American fighter pilots who are distinguished as “aces” in combat.

Several World War II Aces are scheduled to attend the commemoration.

The museum is the home of the American Fighter Aces archive.

The events are free to non-veterans with admission to the museum

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