Reichert calls tax cuts ‘truly historic’

House approves bill Tuesday.

  • Tuesday, December 19, 2017 1:06pm
  • News

Congressman Dave Reichert, R-Auburn, released the following statement on Tuesday after he joined the House in Washington, D.C., to approve the final version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act bill on a 227-203 vote:

“Today is truly historic,” Reichert said in a press release. “We accomplished something that has not been successfully done since 1986. We passed a tax bill to make our tax code work for the American people. It puts more money in your pocket through lower tax rates and an increased standard deduction. To grow wages and jobs here at home, we provide tax relief for businesses big and small.

“While I know these provisions will benefit the American people, I am deeply disappointed that this Conference report rejected my request to remove drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from the bill. Through my years on the Ways and Means Committee, I have consistently evaluated each tax proposal on what it would mean for families and for our economic growth. I am proud to support this bill because it passes this test and I look forward to seeing America better off for it.”

The measure is expected to be approved Tuesday evening by the Senate and then go to President Donald Trump for a signature.

The measure includes lower individual tax rates and higher standard deductions. It also cuts the corporate tax rate to 21 percent from 35 percent.

Policy highlights can be found by clicking here.

More in News

Services set for longtime Kentridge High athletic director Anderson

Memorial July 22 at KR gym; mass July 23 in Renton

Puget Sound Fire call report

Number, type of incidents

The Carlton Complex wildfire burned in north-central Washington state in 2014. Photo by Jason Kriess/Wikimedia Commons
King County burn ban under way

Other counties across the state have already enacted similar restrictions.

Between Seattle’s $15 minimum wage and the new no-poach cause agreement, Washington has been leading the nation in advancing fast food workers’ rights. Photo by Fibonacci Blue/Flickr
Washington AG’s deal grants mobility to fast food workers nationwide

Seven fast food chains have agreed to end no-poaching policies that economists say cause wage stagnation.

Dianne Laurine, a Commissioner for the Seattle Commission for People with Disabilities says that she needs plastic straws to drink liquids, and that she easily bites through ones made out of paper. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
Straw ban leaves disabled community feeling high and dry

Although disabled people are exempted from Seattle’s new law, the impacted community says that businesses haven’t gotten the message.

Fire damages Kent West Hill home

Second fire in two days in neighborhood

Plett crowned Miss Cornucopia

Kentwood honors student earns $3,000 scholarship from Kent Lions

Montessori Plus School hosting open house

The open house will be from 5 to 7 p.m. July 17.

Most Read