Tahoma National Cemetery presents Veterans Day ceremony

  • Thursday, November 9, 2017 2:44pm
  • News

The 20th Veterans Day Program at Tahoma National Cemetery on Saturday celebrates and honors all military members who served, past and present.

This year’s theme is Saluting Our Korean War Veterans.

The ceremony begins at 11 a.m. at the cemetery’s Main Flag Pole Assembly Area, with the Historic Flight Foundation providing a flyover.

Keynote speaker is George Rossman, former mayor of Enumclaw and U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War.

Guest speaker is Mark Daigneault, the administration officer at Tahoma National Cemetery and the last remaining, original staff member hired prior to the opening of Tahoma.

The Canadian Royal Forces Detachment from Joint Base Lewis McChord and their family members will join the ceremony. In Canada, Nov. 11 is celebrated as Remembrance Day.

Rossman, who attended Enumclaw schools and graduated from Saint Martin’s High School in 1951, was enrolled at the University of Idaho, when he was drafted into the Army. His entry into the military followed his five older brothers, who served on active duty in World War II.

On Dec. 23, 1952, Rossman landed at Inchon, South Korea and was assigned to the 21st AAA Battalion, 25th Infantry Division as a crew member on a M-16 Quad 50 Halftrack.

After his honorable discharge, Rossman started his own business and retired in 1998 after 35 years as a local insurance broker.

He was active in the community, serving Enumclaw on boards, commissions, City Council and as mayor for two terms, 1995-2001.

Rossman’s proudest work as mayor was the construction of Veterans Memorial Park and Purple Heart Memorial, together with the Veterans of Foreign Post 1949.

A lifemember of VFW Post 1949 since 1956, Rossman lives in Enumclaw with his wife of 61 years, Marleen.

Tahoma National Cemetery is at 18600 SE 240th St., Kent. Parking space is limited in the cemetery. Plan to walk to and from your parking spot to the ceremony. Disabled Parking is available with a shuttle.

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