Health isn’t just a personal choice

A recent study I read underscores the fact that good health isn’t just a matter of personal choice for Americans.

A recent study I read underscores the fact that good health isn’t just a matter of personal choice for Americans.

It’s tied – in some cases, painfully so – to income levels and geography.

Funded partly through Harvard University and the University of Washington, this study looked at death rates across the U.S. by county, for each year between 1961 and 1999.

It gave researchers a wakeup call, and it should be giving us one too:

That the United States, for all its advances in science and medicine, is increasingly populated by two very different groups – a wealthy class that has access to good health care, and a poorer class, which does not.

In some areas of the U.S. – chiefly the South, southern Midwest, Texas and areas of the Rocky Mountains – life expectancies actually have been going in reverse since the 1980s. And it’s the chronic, lifestyle-related diseases which are the culprits: high blood pressure, diabetes, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Women’s death rates since the 1980s also were increasing in these regions, researchers said, due to (again) chronic diseases that come from smoking and being overweight.

What did this lead researchers to conclude?

“The findings suggest that beginning in the early 1980s and continuing through 1999, those who were already disadvantaged did not benefit from the gains in life expectancy experienced by the advantaged, and some were even worse off.”

And they capped their results with this warning:

“The study emphasizes just how important it is to monitor health inequalities between different groups, in order to ensure that everyone – not just the well-off – can experience gains in life expectancy.”

King County actually did quite well in this study, with the third-highest increase in life expectancy in Washington.

But before we begin to pat ourselves on the back, we need to take a good look around us.

Good health costs money. It costs money to get a checkup; it costs money to eat well. Fat free isn’t free, folks.

And for all of its affluence, King County has a high number of poor and working poor – the numbers of which are climbing. Since the years of this study (which ended in 1999) those numbers have continued to grow. In 2004 alone, the number of King County residents living in poverty jumped to 10.4 percent, up from 7.3 percent the previous year. And the recent setbacks in our economy, coupled with increasing costs for everything from gasoline to bread, will push these struggling families even deeper into the well of poverty.

It’s a no-brainer that the first thing to go is preventative health care, when you can’t pay your bills. Medications also get rationed.

And don’t even think about shopping in the organic-food aisle.

Every day I see the struggles of families here in the Kent valley, where I live.

When you are hungry, you buy your food for calories and cost, more than nutritional content. It’s sad to see what’s rolling down the conveyor belt at the grocery store where I shop, and sadder still to see people digging through their purses and wallets attempting to pay for it. Sometimes, food gets put back.

And if hot dogs are going back on the shelves, it’s a safe bet that medications aren’t getting filled, either.

Which brings me to my original point: good health is more than just waking up one morning and deciding to eat healthier and to get some exercise.

It’s not just a personal choice.

It’s a choice that we as a society have to make.

It’s about making health care – and healthy food – accessible to all, regardless of their income levels.

When it comes to solutions, there is no magic bullet here. In fact, I’d love to hear solutions to this growing crisis – I’d be happy to publish them in the pages of this newspaper.

But I can tell you, the first step to this problem is looking beyond the daily grinds of our own lives, and considering the realities our neighbors must face.

The ones who don’t have jobs. The ones who are working multiple jobs in a desperate attempt to make ends meet.

We’re not really healthy until they are, too.

To learn more about the study, which is titled “The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-Country Mortality Disparities in the United States,” please go to

Laura Pierce is editor of the Kent Reporter

More in Opinion

Ireland: cleaner, greener and more prosperous | Brunell

This St. Patrick’s Day (March 17), the Irish have lots to celebrate.… Continue reading

A year in review and a look ahead for KCLS | Guest op

Every spring, King County Library System presents its annual report to the… Continue reading

Blast from the past returns | Shiers

Ichiro Suzuki is back with the Mariners after the club signed the… Continue reading

Support Proposition A for a safer community | GUEST OP

Kent needs additional police officers to put it in line with other local cities

Poor salmon returns expected | Being Frank

As the tribal and state co-managers begin the annual salmon season setting… Continue reading

Washington’s carbon tax differs from B.C. | Brunell

In Olympia, Gov. Jay Inslee is pushing lawmakers to enact a new… Continue reading

The 3 personas of President Trump | Elfers

“And will the real Donald Trump please stand up?” These famous words… Continue reading

Message from new KCLS director

As the new director of the King County Library System, I am… Continue reading

Kent makes progress to handle its growth | As I See It

I have been thinking about how policing in our country has changed… Continue reading

John Spellman: best leader for tough times | Brunell

Too often, virtues and accomplishments of quiet leaders go unsung. Such is… Continue reading

Time to focus on school choice across America | Guest column

By Andrew R. Campanella/National School Choice Week Later this month, schools, home-school… Continue reading

China’s sword policy cutting deep into recycling | Brunell

Earlier this month, China launched its “national sword” policy which bans many… Continue reading