City of Kent extends Severe Weather Shelter operation through Monday morning

Overnight stays for homeless at Kent Lutheran Church

  • Saturday, February 9, 2019 5:15pm
  • News

The city of Kent will extend the days of its Severe Weather Shelter through Monday morning, Feb. 11, because of the predicted snow and cold temperatures.

The shelter will be open from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. each night at Kent Lutheran Church, 336 Second Ave. S. Check-in and registration starts at 9 p.m. The shelter closes at 7 a.m. and people must leave for the day.

The shelter opened on Sunday, Feb. 3, because of the cold weather. Nearly 50 people were at the shelter the first couple of nights, according to shelter organizers.

Catholic Community Services staff and volunteers from Kent Lutheran Church operate the shelter.

Priority will be given to homeless families with children who are living on the streets or in vehicles, but the shelter will also be available for single women and men. As with all shelters, rules for the health and safety of all clients and staff and the broader community will apply.

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