Honoring ‘the face of Kentridge’

Baseball field named in tribute to school’s late athletic director

Eric Anderson. COURTESY PHOTO

Eric Anderson. COURTESY PHOTO

The Kentridge community gathered last Saturday to honor one of its own as a baseball field at Petrovitsky Park was named after Eric Anderson, the high school’s longtime athletic director who died July 7.

Anderson was 57 years old.

Anderson’s wife, Margy, and their children, Maria and Ian, were on hand for the dedication ceremony. King County Council members Reagan Dunn and Dave Upthegrove and state Sen. Joe Fain, R-Auburn presented the family with a plaque.

During the ceremony, a photo montage was shown, and the family thanked everyone for their support.

Described as “the face of Kentridge,” Anderson began teaching in the Kent School District in 1985 at Meeker Middle School, after working in the Tonasket School District. He came to Kentridge High School in 1998 and became the school’s athletic director in 2000.

Students and staff remember Anderson as an organizer and enthusiastic supporter of sports and academics. He encouraged students in their classrooms and extracurricular endeavors, and was a beloved and compassionate leader and co-worker.

“Eric Anderson was a great man,” Dunn said. “The positive influence he had on Kentridge High School and its students is immeasurable. His selflessness and dedication were admirable, and we lost him too soon.”

Eric Anderson’s children, Maria and Ian, were on hand for the dedication ceremony. SARAH BRENDEN, Reporter

Eric Anderson’s children, Maria and Ian, were on hand for the dedication ceremony. SARAH BRENDEN, Reporter

Eric Anderson Memorial Park honors Kentridge’s beloved leader. SARAH BRENDEN, Reporter

Eric Anderson Memorial Park honors Kentridge’s beloved leader. SARAH BRENDEN, Reporter

More in News

Racist, sexist claims by Das cause racket in Olympia

Senator says it’s more of a inherent bias

King County Metro considers Auburn, Kent sites for new bus base

Three finalists; facility to open in 2030

File photo
King County examines gun violence trends

Nearly 77 percent of shooting victims so far this year in county have been people of color.

In this file photo, marchers make their way from Trinity Episcopal Church in Everett on Feb. 26, 2017. Muslim refugees’ admissions into the U.S. have declined by 85 percent since the Trump administration came into power in 2017, according to the International Rescue Committee. Sound Publishing file photo
Report: Fewer refugees settling in U.S. and Washington state

Admissions are on pace to only reach around one-fifth of their limit in 2019.

Das claims racism, sexism during closed-door legislative meetings in Olympia

First-year senator speaks her mind at Kent Chamber of Commerce gathering

Puget Sound Fire call report

Type, number of incidents

More bear sightings in Kent

Monday near Scenic Hill Elementary School

Most Read