Kent’s red-light camera warning period ends soon

Nearly 1,000 warnings issued in first 19 days; $136 tickets start Aug. 13

Kent Police issued nearly 1,000 warnings in the first 19 days of a new red-light camera program at three intersections.

A total of 993 warnings were issued through July 31, said Kent Police Assistant Chief Jarod Kasner. That’s an average of about 52 per day. The warning period began July 13. Drivers (actually registered owners of the vehicle) received a written warning in the mail.

Officers will issue $136 tickets starting Tuesday, Aug. 13.

The cameras during phase one of the program are at:

• Central Avenue North and East Smith Street: northbound and southbound

• Central Avenue North and East James Street: northbound and eastbound

• Kent Des Moines Road and Pacific Highway South: eastbound

The City Council in November approved a five-year contract with Arizona-based American Traffic Solutions (ATS) Inc., for as much as $651,000 per year for camera installation and maintenance along with the processing and mailing of infractions. ATS is the same company the city contracts with for about $367,000 per year for school traffic zone cameras to catch speeding drivers.

Kent will use revenue from the red-light cameras to pay for body-worn cameras for 105 police officers at a cost of about $1.63 million over five years.

The second phase, to kick off later this summer, will include cameras at:

• 104th Avenue SE and SE 240th Street: eastbound and westbound

• 104th Avenue SE and SE 256th Street: northbound and eastbound

• 84th Avenue South and S 212th Street: northbound and southbound

For more information, go to the city website at kentwa.gov.

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