School is back in session, and KCLS is ready to help

It is fall and a busy time for teachers, students and parents.

It is also a great time to remind residents that King County Library System (KCLS) has a host of programs, services and resources to make the back-to-school transition easier.

KCLS has long collaborated with schools to support education and bolster learning, and our Student eCard program is a great example of that. Piloted in late 2015, the program is now offered in the 18 school districts KCLS serves. With a library eCard, K-12 students can access online resources, such as Tutor.com for tutoring assistance. Tutor.com also offers free, one-on-one tutoring via chat and audio for entry-level college students and adult learners in subjects such as math and science, Advanced Placement courses, and English and bilingual instruction.

Students can also head to their nearest library for homework help after school, thanks to retired teachers and others who volunteer as tutors. High school students and their parents can get information about the college-application process or future career opportunities at college-prep and Life After High School programs.

There are many educational milestones in a student’s life and the importance of early childhood education cannot be overstated. World Language Story Times and online resources like ABCMouse or BookFlix help prepare young children for school and get them started on a path to lifelong learning.

KCLS’ broad array of materials support student learning at all levels. Databases are treasure-troves of information on subjects ranging from history, health, technology, literature, finances, and more. Use Lynda.com to sharpen computer skills, or Mango to learn a new language. Kanopy gives patrons access to the highly-regarded Great Courses series and other popular PBS programming. TechTutors teach software skills and classes provide a pathway to certification.

KCLS is ready to help you find the information you need for research projects, school reports and other class assignments. Have a question? Visit any of our 49 libraries for in-person assistance. Can’t get to a library? Call or email Ask KCLS for quick answers. Many people do. Last year, our busy online staff logged 51,854 phone calls and 8,280 emails.

If you are not one of the 10 million who visit our libraries annually, we hope you will. Make a back-to-school resolution to see all that is going on. And if you do not yet have a library card, check out our new eCard option for immediate access to KCLS’ online and digital collections.

Lisa Rosenblum is director of the King County Library System.

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