Project Feast launches Ubuntu Street Cafe in Kent

  • Wednesday, March 22, 2017 10:28am
  • Business

The Ubuntu Street Cafe, 202 W. Gowe St., is open from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday through Friday for lunch.

Project Feast, a non-profit dedicated to empowering immigrants and refugees to secure sustainable employment in the food industry, has opened Ubuntu Street Cafe, 202 W. Gowe St., in the Titusville building in downtown Kent.

Project Feast’s four-month culinary apprenticeship program, accredited by Highline College, is offered for immigrants and refugees looking to gain skills and experience for a career in the food industry. The class meets at the cafe every weekday for five hours of intensive culinary training.

Ubuntu Street Cafe is powered by the culinary apprenticeship program and is open from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch Wednesday through Friday.

In addition to the cafe, Project Feast offers catering, pop-up dinners and other community events (tickets and dates are posted on their website: projectfeast.org/).

Although the menu will change with each new class of apprentices, it currently highlights cuisine from Ukraine, Ethiopia and Iraq.

Iryna, an immigrant from the Ukraine introduced Borscht ($5), red beets, green cabbage,and potatoes with beef broth that “must always be served with a pampushka (a mini garlic roll)” to be the authentic dish she remembers from home. She plans to use the skills and knowledge gained from her apprenticeship with Project Feast to open a bakery in South Seattle.

Bebe, a refugee from the DR Congo plans to develop her customer service skills to secure steady employment in the food industry and eventually start her own business. Tenaye, an immigrant from Ethiopia, wanted to showcase her home country’s Injera and Beef Roll ($8), a teff flatbread filled with spicy stewed beef. Upon graduation, she hopes to support her family working in a kitchen. Other dishes include Tepsi Bathenjan ($8), Burmese Chicken Curry ($8), Tres Leches Cupcake ($3), and a Chai family recipe ($3).

As a 501(c)3 nonprofit, all proceeds from the cafe are used to fuel Project Feast’s programs to support immigrants and refugees, as well as to be a platform for intercultural exchange through food. Through hands on training in their commercial kitchen and lunch restaurant, leadership skill building, and job readiness support, Project Feast’s goal is to help their participants unlock their potential as culinary professionals and community leaders.

More in Business

Former Mayor White gets a star

For role in bringing Kent Station shopping center to downtown

State adds 6,000 jobs in June; unemployment rate holds steady at 4.6 percent

Washington’s economy gained 6,000 jobs in June and the state’s seasonally adjusted… Continue reading

Public invited to nominate Washington businesses that go the extra mile

Each year, the Office of the Secretary of State calls for nominations… Continue reading

Founder, co-owner of The BoxMaker, a Kent company, passes away

David Hill driven to ‘do something different’ as innovative leader

Washington’s average wage tops $65,000 in 2018

Washington’s average annual wage grew by 5.5 percent in 2018 to $65,301,… Continue reading

50 electric buses coming to local transit agencies; $13.3M from VW settlement used to reduce diesel pollution

The number of electric buses rolling through Washington communities will more than… Continue reading

Group buys Kent’s Bryson Square Apartments for $43.2 million

198-unit complex built in 1988 on East Hill

Makerspaces essential solution to job gap | SBA

By Jeremy Field, U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) When it comes to… Continue reading

Farmers market season opens

Lisa Rasmussen, owner of Designs by Lisa, Inc, above, displays some of… Continue reading