Comic book collection is still a staple of Emerald City Comic Con. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

Comic book collection is still a staple of Emerald City Comic Con. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

Fandoms converge at Emerald City Comic Con

Even with big names at this year’s con, locals brought the good vibes to the nerdy weekend.

One of the biggest comic book and “nerdy” conventions in the Pacific Northwest, the Emerald City Comic Con (ECCC) made its triumphant return this past weekend.

Local artists, writers, cosplayers, vendors and publishers sold their wares, promoted their work, and worked with their contemporaries from across the country to make for an exciting and fun-filled four days Feb. 29 through March 3.

Taking place at the Seattle Convention Center’s Arch and Summit locations, ECCC 2024 brought Godzilla-sized crowds, with locals standing in line to take pictures with — and get autographs from — noted celebrities across multiple fandoms like Chris Evans, Christina Ricci, Misha Collins, select cast members of the “Lord of the Rings” films and the cast of the “Avatar: The Last Airbender” animated series.

Major Pacific Northwest-based companies like Nintendo, Pokémon and Renton’s Wizards of the Coast were a major draw to ECCC with special rooms and panels dedicated to popular games Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: The Gathering.

In the past, the focus of ECCC was the world of comic books and their films and television adaptations — along with the classic nerdy fandoms of Star Wars and Star Trek. But over the years, it has become more inclusive, not only of newer fandoms and mediums, but also of spaces for folks who are interested in book publishing, creating impressive cosplays, LGBTQ+ youth and more.

Panels were also a highlight of the weekend, covering a wide spectrum from issues within popular media to Barbie meetups to experiencing free-play of board games created by local indie game developers.

Writer Olivia Cuartero-Briggs holds up “Gender Queer: A Memoir” by Maia Kobabe, the most banned book in the United States, during an ECCC 2024 panel about banned books. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

Writer Olivia Cuartero-Briggs holds up “Gender Queer: A Memoir” by Maia Kobabe, the most banned book in the United States, during an ECCC 2024 panel about banned books. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

One particular panel was called “Keep Bans Off Our Books,” which was hosted by Maggie Block, deputy publisher of Seattle’s Hinton Publishing and former King County Library System librarian at the Skyway Library near Renton. The panel included authors and graphic novel artists like Richard Fairgray, Olivia Cuartero-Briggs, Teo Duvall and Royden Lepp.

The panel discussed banned books and its effects on authors and young readers alike.

“I think what we should be concerned about more with children is that they need to have private reading lives,” said Cuartero-Briggs. “That is where they can explore outside of their parents and their communities and discover things, and that is something that that we’re limiting.”

One thing that sets ECCC apart from other large comic conventions is the general demeanor of Pacific Northwesterners who politely move in sync throughout the Artist Alley, with one vendor saying: “You know you’re in Seattle when everyone walks in single file.”

Los Angeles-based artist Sang Lam agreed with this sentiment: “I think this convention is way more relaxed than the other ones I’ve been to.”


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One cosplayer went all out with a life-size version of local artist Henry’s famous Sasquatch character, who can be found on murals, t-shirts and other merchandise throughout South King County and the Pacific Northwest. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing.

One cosplayer went all out with a life-size version of local artist Henry’s famous Sasquatch character, who can be found on murals, t-shirts and other merchandise throughout South King County and the Pacific Northwest. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing.

One young dedicated cosplayer went all out as Bender from the beloved animated series “Futurama.” Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing.

One young dedicated cosplayer went all out as Bender from the beloved animated series “Futurama.” Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing.

This cosplay of Nemesis from the “Resident Evil” video games turned heads with its impressive artistry and enormous size at ECCC 2024. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing.

This cosplay of Nemesis from the “Resident Evil” video games turned heads with its impressive artistry and enormous size at ECCC 2024. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing.

A pink-themed Eye of Sauron and The One Ring from “The Lord of the Ring” series made an appearance amongst the cosplayers at ECCC 2024. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

A pink-themed Eye of Sauron and The One Ring from “The Lord of the Ring” series made an appearance amongst the cosplayers at ECCC 2024. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

Grogu of “The Mandalorian” was a favorite among backpack accessories at ECCC 2024. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

Grogu of “The Mandalorian” was a favorite among backpack accessories at ECCC 2024. Photo by Bailey Jo Josie/Sound Publishing

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