Assault charges against state Rep. Simpson dropped

A case against state Rep. Geoff Simpson, alleging that he assaulted his ex-wife in April, has been dropped. Covington’s city prosecutor, Thomas Hargan, noted, “I dismissed the charges (on May 28) without prejudice based on insufficient evidence going forward.”

  • Monday, June 9, 2008 5:08pm
  • News

Prosecutor cites lack of evidence

A case against state Rep. Geoff Simpson, alleging that he assaulted his ex-wife in April, has been dropped.

Covington’s city prosecutor, Thomas Hargan, noted, “I dismissed the charges (on May 28) without prejudice based on insufficient evidence going forward.”

Hargan went on to explain that due to the lack of evidence, he was unable to prove that there was an unlawful use of force by Simpson during an altercation with his ex-wife.

King County Sheriff Department deputies went to Simpson’s home in Covington on April 27 after he was accused by his former wife, Kathy Simpson, of grabbing her by the wrist and arm.

Kathy Simpson, according to the deputies’ incident report, was holding onto tax documents for the pair and they were arguing over it. She had gone to Geoff Simpson’s home to retrieve some belongings when the argument began. The couple’s divorce was finalized just a few days earlier, according to court documents.

According to the report, Kathy Simpson alleged that her ex-husband grabbed her right arm and squeezed, and that when she reached for the tax documents she had dropped, he grabbed her arm again and hurt her.

Geoff Simpson was arrested on suspicion of fourth-degree assault and interfering with reporting of domestic violence.

Following the incident, Simpson denied he hurt his ex-wife during the reported argument and said he believed that he would be cleared of the charges.

In a statement received by the Reporter on Monday, Simpson said, “It has been a tough few weeks. I have been confident that this matter would be resolved, and despite the unfortunate experience, I remain appreciative of the work done by those in our justice system to protect potential victims as well as innocent citizens.

“If there is a bright side to this experience,it’s the overwhelming encouragement I’ve received from family, friends, colleagues and supporters. I’ll always be grateful to everyone who has stood by me,” he said.

Simpson, the father of three children, has been involved in local politics for many years. A former Covington City Councilman, he has served in the Legislature since 2000 in one of the 47th District’s House of Representatives positions, and he is running for re-election this fall. He formally announced his candidacy Tuesday.

“Now that this is behind me, and with the unanimous and sole endorsement of the 47th District Democrats, I’m ready to focus my attention on the future,” he said. “My re-election campaign is under way, and I intend to resume my chairmanship of the House Local Government Committee from which I temporarily took leave.”

Simpson has worked for the Kent Fire Department as a firefighter since 1990. After the incident with his ex-wife in April, the department put him on administrative leave pending the results of what a department spokesman called an internal “fact-finding mission” by the department. Officials couldn’t be reached for an update on his status.

Staff writer Kris Hill can be reached at (425) 432-1209 (extension 5054) and khill@reporternewspapers.com


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